April 20th, 2012

The Human Brain Evolved? That's Inconceivable!

 

 

We’ve been told that the mindless process of evolution produced a thinking brain over billions of years.  Yet today’s brightest scientists and their greatest technological advances are still incapable of duplicating the human brain’s awesome potential.  They concede that the computer on our shoulders is still the very best one in the universe. 

           

On June 28, 2000, IBM proudly announced their newest and most powerful super computer, “ASCI White.”  They proclaimed that it performs 12.3 trillion operations per second.  It has 8,192 microprocessors, and is 1000 times more powerful than their prior computer, “ASCI Blue.”  It covers 9,920 square feet of floor space, spanning an equivalent of two NBA Basketball Courts, and weighs a mere 106 tons.  This is pretty massive!

           

But how does this technological achievement compare to the mere 2 or 3 pound, compact, human brain?  The Associated Press reported “(IBM’s) latest machine is intended to continue the advance toward matching and eventually surpassing the computing capacity of the human brain.”(1)  Did you catch that?  Compared to the world’s greatest super computer, the human brain remains superior.  If computers don’t happen by accident, neither can the brain!

           

I believe God alone should be given due credit as the Grand Designer, and Creator of all things.  This self evident truth is ever present in every day routine activities.

           

Consider the “simple process” of reading this article.  In less than a 1/5 of a second, the title word “Inconceivable” is directed from this article to our amazing eye, then to the front of the brain’s left hemisphere.  Now begins the interpretation of its meaning!  At the very same time, a different frontal brain region considers other potential meanings.  Still within this first second, after the frontal region has applied a meaning, a back region of the left hemisphere becomes active.  It’s then believed that the individual meaning of the word is harmonized within the context of the phrase, or sentence.(2)

           

Sentence reading is an even more incredibly complex process.  Please never again say, “I’m just, simply reading.”  Instead, give God the glory for his wise design.

           

The brain also enhances reading comprehension by suppressing useless stimuli from even entering into the mind.  For example, background noise and the constant stimulation of clothing touching our skin is routinely ignored.  Incredibly, 99% of all sensory information is rejected as insignificant and warrants no response.(3)  Only when important information is perceived are the impulses channeled to the appropriate regions in the brain.

           

Lastly, the brain is also programmed with a “rerouting format’ that makes it far superior to any known computer.  Science News explains, “…the brain maintains a distinct advantage over the computer – resilience.  When crucial interactions between neurons falter, the brain reroutes signals in an attempt to maintain the ability to think, remember, and perceive.”  In the same article, neurologist and computer scientist. James Reggia, of the University of Maryland in College Park says, “When you damage just one small part of the computer, the whole thing will collapse.  The brain is very different.  It is able to adjust its own circuitry.”(4)

 

It is inconceivable to praise evolution for the brain’s formation, or its ability to monitor, maintain, and regulate all the bodily functions.  The precious gift of memory and the tremendous variety of brain functions testifies of an all knowing, all wise, Creator and Savior.  To Him alone, should we devote our hearts, and dedicate our minds.

 

By Dr. Dan Korow

 

References:

1 - Big Blue Announces Big, Fast Computer, Associated Press, D. Ian Hopper, The Colorado Springs Gazette, June 29, 2000.

2 - Science News, Making Cerebral Sense Of Words, March 11, 1995, Vol. 147, No. 10, p.157

3 - Textbook of Medical Physiology, Guyton, 1981, pp. 560-561

4 - Mimicking The Brain; Using Computers to Investigate Neurological Disorders, Science News, July 22, 1995, Vol. 148. No. 4, p.62

 

Originally Published in the March/April 2001 Think and Believe.

 

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